Selasa, 04 Februari 2014

[GALLERY] Rumah-rumah dengan Desain Unik di Jepang



HOUSE = a building in which people, especially a single family, live.

Rumah dapat diartikan sebagai tempat perlindungan untuk menikmati kehidupan, beristirahat dan berinteraksi sesama anggota keluarga.
Di dalam rumah, penghuni memperolah kesan pertama dari kehidupannya di dunia ini.
Rumah yang ideal harus menjamin kepentingan keluarga, yaitu untuk tumbuh, berkembang dan juga bersosialisasi dengan tetangga lainnya.

Bagi beberapa arsitek di Jepang, rumah bukan hanya sekedar tempat tinggal.
Untuk itulah TS mencoba menghadirkan potret rumah-rumah unik di Jepang.
Agan-aganwati boleh coba mengamati keunikannya, mulai dari penggunaan material untuk bangunan, dan bahkan pemilihan warna yang cenderung natural.

Kiranya bisa menjadi inspirasi.

 



Arigatou Gozaimasu, Minna-San



Spoiler for Look Inside The Wooden Light Walls House in Toyokawa, Japan

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This small home in the town of Toyokawa, Japan is sandwiched between two-story buildings that create shadows over the structure. mA-style Architects solved this darkness problem by opening up the roof so that the beams direct sunlight into the house, lighting up the laminated wood interior with patterns of rays that change throughout the day. The interior is divided up by four boxes accessible via ladders that serve as private rooms, whose space intervals create pathways.



Spoiler for House That Hangs Halfway Above The Yatsugatake Mountain

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Kidosaki Architects built this house on the edge of the Yatsugatake Mountain in Nagano, Japan to satisfy the commissioner’s desire to enjoy incredible views of the surrounding nature. The architects adhered to traditional Japanese architectural principles and embraced the immediate environment, designing the house in such a way for it to coexist with the mountainscape. Two bracing steel cylinders hold the structure that freely hangs halfway above the edge, which gives occupants an almost 360-degree view.



Spoiler for The Sprawled Box "House O" in Hokkaido, Japan


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This one-story House O in a small town of Hokkaido, Japan, was strategically planned according to the site’s climate and topographic properties. Unconventional to Japan’s usually dense and narrow architecture, House O is made up of box-like structures that are widely spread out on the unpopulated landscape. The orientation of the boxes are thought out with path circulation in mind, giving the center living room the highest ceiling, with other spaces branching out from it. The pockets of spaces also control the internal temperature during the region’s extreme climates, exposing the many surface sides to sunlight in the winter and aiding in ventilation in the summer. Unlike the all-black exterior, the interior is all white with natural timber, brightening and visually opening the space for the occupants.



Spoiler for The "Beyond The Hill" House in Yokohama With A Public Seating Deck


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Architect Kazuhiko Kishimoto had the local community in mind for Beyond the Hill, a timber house he built on a steep slope in Yokohama. On the lowest level, wide stairs decline downward along the site, leading to a center courtyard open to the sky. The client, who teaches cooking classes in her kitchen, wanted a home that encouraged public invitation.

The interior is clad in the same timber floors with white walls. A series of small windows create dynamic shadows that pattern the walls, visually changing throughout the day.



Spoiler for The Open House H in Chiba, Japan


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The all-white, smooth-surface exterior houses an all-wooden interior with Y-shaped frames that visually divide the open space. The architects’ intention was to build a modern home for a small family so that they can more or less always feel where they are inside, hence the riser-less stairs and second-story balconies that look over the ground floor.



Spoiler for The "Pilotes in a Forest" Studio by Go Hasegawa, Tokyo

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This weekend home by Go Hasegawa is located in a mature tree forest three hours away from Tokyo. Propped over 20 feet above the ground by thin X-shape support frames, the main structure boasts 360-degree views of the surroundings above the tree line. Below, an open plaza is furnished by a humble outdoor wooden table and benches, the square space walled in by the forest that becomes part of the dwelling. Even though this studio looks simple and unsophisticated, it has full plumbing, housing a kitchen and bathroom as well as a bedroom and living room.
Spoiler for The Completely Open House T in Tokyo

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The house is completely and dizzyingly open on the inside, with gaping walls whose holes connect the different living spaces. Small rooms projected to the side, accessible via the main bookshelf-staircase and ladders, make a semi-separate floor, adding additional space to the small home. The ceilings — or lack thereof — are framed by thin ledges that seem dangerous to walk on, unprotected by any sort of railing or support structure. Definitely not childsafe.






Spoiler for The A-Frame Koya No Sumika House in Japan

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The work of Japan’s mA-style Architects may be familiar to readers; we’ve previously written on their Totoro and Shizuka homes. The firm’s namesakes, Atsushi and Mayumi Kawamoto, turn to the local environments and their client’s needs when developing future residences. Take for example this A-frame addition in the Shizuoka Prefecture of Japan: built as a “living extension” off the main house, the addition serves to add space to both the home and those residing within it. A corridor connects the west side of the main house to the vertical length addition. Natural light runs the length of the space and highlights the natural wood-colored V-beams supporting the roof.






Spoiler for Villa Kanousan in Honshu Island, Japan

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With the seemingly ordinary cube-like structure sitting on a humble hillside of Honshu Island, Japan, you might not guess that the interior of this Villa Kanousan is the farthest thing from ordinary. Yuusuke Karasawa architects designed this small two-story weekend house with the theme of “cubic voids,” cutting out geometric shapes out of the walls at different angles and sizes. This wasn’t only to add a visually interesting dynamic or to give occupants vertigo, but it was also to “redefine privacy” and establish “strong connections between the rooms. Even when the doors are closed, thresholds between rooms are constantly open,” making this abode extremely intimate and special.






Spoiler for Green Screen House by Hideo Kumaki

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Japanese architecture firm Hideo Kumaki showcase their “Green Screen House” that incorporates carefully calculated environmental design while adding to the homes beauty and functionality. The living wall creates an intimately lit outdoor living/dining space and provides for a sense of privacy. The curved home stays cool in the summer months in an enclave of vegetation and incorporates thermal design features that help reduce engery consumption, so there is no need for A/C. The architecture firm avoided straight lines in their design to create a sense of unity and seamlessness of the interior and exterior space.






Spoiler for The Ideal Shared House by Naruse Inokuma, Nagoya

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With a growing demand for shared properties across Japan, Naruse Inokuma Architects lay out their ideal design in this Nagoya property. The concept is based around giving equally sized private individual rooms – (a staggering) 13 bedrooms, 7.2 square metres each, whilst creating a number of open-plan shared spaces across the three floors allowing for large gatherings. Whilst living in a house with 13 other people sounds like some kind of permanent youth hostel nightmare, the space seems big enough to make escape a possibility whilst offering plenty of opportunity for chit-chat with your fellow housemates. The architect describes “The shared and individual spaces were studied simultaneously and, by laying out individual rooms in a three-dimensional fashion, multiple areas, each with a different sense of comfort, were established in the remaining shared space.”






Spoiler for The White Cave House by Takuro Yamamoto, Kanazawa City

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Japan just keeps churning out incredible builds, here’s another to get stuck into. Takuro Yamamoto Architects designed this one with Kanazawa city’s heavy snowfall in mind. So, what better way to protect yourself then with a big white cave? For days when the weather’s a little kinder, a terrace and huge central courtyard surrounded by glass, giving a view into the living/dining/kitchen space. A traditional Japanese room, an incredible roof terrace with water held by a thin waterproof membrane and more minimal goodness than you can shake a stick at.
Spoiler for Floating House in Ikoma City, Japan

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Heavy on the wood and flooded with light thanks to numerous skylights, the house is supported at the back by raised earth and at the front by four pillars giving the appearance of a floating structure and creating a shaded play area for the children. Three floors including top attic space, second floor kitchen and living, eating and sleeping on the first, the architect comments “We hope that this family of four can have a house for their family in the wake of the 3.11 earthquake and live comfortably in their own way.”




Spoiler for A Curved House by Naoko Horibe, Tokushima

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Located in Naruto-Shi, Tokushima, Japan, this incredible home from Naoko Horibe Architects has the feel of those fancy 1950s California homes with its sweeping curved front and narrow pillars. That’s where the similarity ends, inside this is all stark modern concrete and clean surfaces. Constructed on raised foundations, a necessity in a flood-prone area, the rooms are built around a central rectangular courtyard, accessible from all sides through sliding glass panels, providing some incredible light (and shadow) across the interior.




Spoiler for Kiritoushi House by Daisuke Sugawara, Chiba

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Located in Chiba prefecture, Japan, Daisuke Sugawara Architects present Kiritoushi House, a family home whose name is “derived from the inversely sculpted forms from within a simple exterior shell.” Strange in both its proportions and layout, the house is divided into separate rooms, some large, some small, by a series of angular walls creating uneven surfaces and odd shadows.




Spoiler for A Flattened Tree House, Hiroshima

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We’re no strangers to the idea of living in a modern treehouse, but how about living in a flattened treehouse to interact with nature? Located in Hiroshima, Japan, UID Architects utilized the perfect space in between a rich forest and bare hilly land (neat the road) to create a home that allowed two lifestyles. Cubes stacked over one another like building blocks create a flattened illusion that doesn’t stick out or take away from building’s raw counterparts in the forest. It might just be the perfect place to sit and observe nature in it’s own habitat.




Spoiler for "All White" House by Yasunari Tsukada, Kagawa

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After looking through our gallery, you’ll be surprised to find out that this all white residence in Kagawa, Japan by Yasunari Tsukada is actually a massive home. It actually houses four bedrooms, multiple seating and living areas coupled with a veranda. The use of openings on the walls create an environment that is equally cohesive as it is private – perfect for maintaining family space. The use of glass blocks allow natural light to come into play, surrounding the whole interior in a stark white space.




Spoiler for Idokoro House, Shizuoka

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No one can deny that it’s always nice to have a house overlooking the ocean or city views. But the idea of simplicity has been been overlooked by modern minimalism in the last decade. The idea of the Idokoro House in Shizouka, Japan by mA-Style Architects goes back to the roots of our basic needs: with the main color palette of browns, beiges and whites, we see a simple rectangular house with lots of open space on the interior despite what looks like one single window on the outside. One can’t help but wonder if this is what a Muji house would look like.
Spoiler for The 8008 Hillside Residence by Hiroyuki Arima, Fukuoka

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On a steep hill in Fukuoka, Japan, we see two different housing structures facing different angles. Developed by Hiroyuki Arima of Urban Fourth, the property was split into eight different zones containing 8008 plants in the vicinity (hence leading to the name.) Precise calculations allow natural light to flood the rooms, creating a beautiful interior. Those views overlooking the ocean from a higher ground also can’t be that bad.




Spoiler for Look Onto The Shonan Sea from The Nowhere Resort in Japan

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“Nowhere but Sajima” is the latest Nowhere Resort that offers seaside residences. It stands on a point of triangular reclaimed land in a small fishing village and stands between sea and land. It allows guests to look into the Shonan sea as a method of escape from urbanism and resembles looking out from a ship deck. This home is available for rent by guests on a weekly basis – finally a home we can experience.




Spoiler for Optical Glass House by Hiroshi Nakamura, Hiroshima

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We take a look inside the Optical Glass House by Hiroshi Nakamura and NAP Architects. Situated along a busy street in Hiroshima, Japan, the house serves as place of solitude and privacy with the idea of a garden hidden behind an optical glass facade made from borosilicate. Guarding the interior from all traffic noise, it creates a resort-like world in the heart of the city.




Spoiler for Yatsugatake Villa, Yamanashi - Japan

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Another great piece of Japanese design from a country with more than its fair share of incredible homes. The Yatsugatake Villa by MDS Architects is home for a retired couple who recently escaped the city for a quiet life in the Yamanashi hills. Surrounded by vegetable patches, the home opens up, blurring the boundries between indoors and outdoors. With no heating or air conditioning the structure is designed to deal with extremes at either end of the scale. Insulated glass walls take in plenty of light and warmth from the sun in the colder months with huge sliding doors allowing air to circulate during the summer.




Spoiler for A Home on Stilts - 'Pit House' by Keisuke Maeda, Okayama

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There’s something very appealing about a home that you can walk underneath. If you’ve ever fancied living on stilts this home in Okayama Japan will most definitely be your thing. Designed by Keisuke Maeda of UID Architects, the Pit House sits on top of a hill with a concrete cylinder core forming the centre to which the whole structure is built around. Curving levels house the bedrooms, kitchen etc while the whole space is bordered by a rock garden and indoor trees, the structure itself comprised of wood stretching from floor to ceiling. A strange, disorientating but beautiful design.




Spoiler for 'Coil' by Akihisa Hirata - The S Shaped House

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Living in a house constantly on a bend may not be for everyone, however architect Akihisa Hirata puts forward a strong argument for this ingenious use of space. ‘Coil’ is a winding staircase built around three pillars with rooms opening up at various intervals. A brave move for its residents which include a couple of kids, this simple but beautifully decorated home would suit those with minimum clutter and good balance.



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